This is what happens when warehouse employees are forced to work asset protection.

Part 2
Part 3
Part 4

spuandi:

this is literally my favourite snapchat photo set in the history of forever

trynottodrown:

Hawksbill Turtle in Fish Rock Cave - South West Rocks | Rowland Cain
fyeahvolcanoes:

Etna Eruption, 9 February 2012 by CyboRoZ on Flickr.
marinemammalblog:

So Happy to Greet the New Year by Bliss Images on Flickr.
ididitfordoug:

ididitfordoug:

It’s that time of year again! Sea turtle nesting season starts today! Nesting season runs from May through October, and usually the first nests will hatch right around July. Just a few friendly reminders:
Lights out! Baby sea turtles instinctively follow the brightest light (which should be the moon) out to the ocean, but lights from houses, condos, and roads can easily distract them. If you live near the water, keeping your lights off will give the little guys a better chance of making it to the ocean. Also, red or orange lights are a great alternative to white lights; since sea turtles see poorly in the red/orange spectrum, red lights are a great way to light your beach and keep the turtles safe at the same time.
Be sure to keep your beaches clean. Nesting sea turtles will often become disoriented by cluttered beaches, and unnecessary debris can easily block a newborn hatchling’s path to the water. Something as simple as picking up a piece of trash can make a big difference.
If you see a turtle nest (either marked or unmarked) be sure not to disturb it; disturbing the eggs can disrupt their development, and it is in fact illegal. Tampering with nests can earn you a hefty fine, or even jail time. If you see someone getting to close, politely ask them to give the nest some space. If they persist, contact a lifeguard or authorities to let them know; they’ll take it from there.
If you happen to find any hatchlings on the beach that are injured, stuck on shore, or in a place that isn’t the ocean, do not collect them yourself. Contact a lifeguard, authorities, Fish and Wildlife, or your local sea turtle patrol. Keep an eye on the nest while someone comes to assist you.
Sea turtles typically lay their eggs late at night, but if you do happen upon a mother laying her eggs, do not disturb her. You may watch, but keep a good distance from her, and keep your lights low. Birth is stressful; give mama her space. 
In areas where sea turtles are populous, nesting patrols are common, and always in need of volunteers! Contact your local sea turtle patrol if you’re interested in helping out.

Happy World Sea Turtle Day! Always remember to look out for the little ones! :)

ididitfordoug:

ididitfordoug:

It’s that time of year again! Sea turtle nesting season starts today! Nesting season runs from May through October, and usually the first nests will hatch right around July. Just a few friendly reminders:

  • Lights out! Baby sea turtles instinctively follow the brightest light (which should be the moon) out to the ocean, but lights from houses, condos, and roads can easily distract them. If you live near the water, keeping your lights off will give the little guys a better chance of making it to the ocean. Also, red or orange lights are a great alternative to white lights; since sea turtles see poorly in the red/orange spectrum, red lights are a great way to light your beach and keep the turtles safe at the same time.
  • Be sure to keep your beaches clean. Nesting sea turtles will often become disoriented by cluttered beaches, and unnecessary debris can easily block a newborn hatchling’s path to the water. Something as simple as picking up a piece of trash can make a big difference.
  • If you see a turtle nest (either marked or unmarked) be sure not to disturb it; disturbing the eggs can disrupt their development, and it is in fact illegal. Tampering with nests can earn you a hefty fine, or even jail time. If you see someone getting to close, politely ask them to give the nest some space. If they persist, contact a lifeguard or authorities to let them know; they’ll take it from there.
  • If you happen to find any hatchlings on the beach that are injured, stuck on shore, or in a place that isn’t the ocean, do not collect them yourself. Contact a lifeguard, authorities, Fish and Wildlife, or your local sea turtle patrol. Keep an eye on the nest while someone comes to assist you.
  • Sea turtles typically lay their eggs late at night, but if you do happen upon a mother laying her eggs, do not disturb her. You may watch, but keep a good distance from her, and keep your lights low. Birth is stressful; give mama her space. 
  • In areas where sea turtles are populous, nesting patrols are common, and always in need of volunteers! Contact your local sea turtle patrol if you’re interested in helping out.

Happy World Sea Turtle Day! Always remember to look out for the little ones! :)